Photography 101
Day Eighteen
Prompt: Edge & Alignment

Cambodia’s Angkor Wat is stunning, but it was the “jungle temple” in the Angkor complex, Ta Prohm, that lured me in. Centuries-old carvings have fallen victim to time and tree roots. Still, it’s a living site — impossibly-hued moss covers tumbles of stone. Visitors clamber over, under, and behind, seeking hidden crannies.

In some areas, walls still stand, their intact windows creating frames and portals. The solid, straight edges of the windows are a stark contrast to the waterfall of stones on either side:

image

Today, show us an edge — a straight line, a narrow ridge, a precipice.

Today’s Tip: To make sure your edge packs a punch, use a photo editing tool to check the alignment and adjust the image, if needed, so that your edge is perfectly straight.

Most photo editing software or apps include a straightening tool that imposes a grid over your photo — you move the image until your edge aligns with one of the straight grid lines, and voila! There are a few ways to tackle this, many of them free:

If you use Instagram, straighten an image with the Adjust Tool. Other phone editing apps — Snapseed, Camera+, VSCO — offer similar abilities.Free photo editing site PicMonkey lets you upload and edit any photo. To straighten, choose a photo from your computer, then click “Edit” and choose the “Rotate” tab. Use the slider to adjust your photo’s angle.Photoshop and Lightroom, two popular pieces of software, each have a straightening tool. In Photoshop, adjust a photo’s angle while cropping, or use theRuler to see the precise angle of your line. In Lightroom, look for the “Crop and Straighten” tool; it’s the first icon on the left in the Develop Module.

You can also use these tools to make sure your leading lines go exactly where you want them, or to straighten a photo to emphasize the “Rule of Thirds.”

Cheers,
Michelle W. and the WordPress.com Team